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What Bugs Us

No, we're not talking about boaters running their generators in a quiet anchorage... Spending as much time as we do outdoors, inevitably we get close to some of Earth's smaller inhabitants. A few are unwelcome and get squashed (when possible). Those that don't fly up our noses nor extract a blood donation, we leave alone. Here's a selection of bugs we've spotted over a couple of months in Mexico. Most of them we don't know by name, but enjoy the photos anyhow!

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We'll start with some pretty butterflies to ease ourselves into this...

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We were intently examining this black butterfly, when one of the dozens of cats nearby wandered over to see what had us so entranced.

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Our first hint of doom was the shadow of the cat's paw in our viewfinder.

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Followed very quickly by the pouncing cat, capturing and consuming the butterfly we were admiring.

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Speaking of pouncing and eating, here are two bugs that enjoy feasting on humans: a mosquito [left], and a jejene (pronounced hey-hey-nay). Jejenes are tiny enough to fly through many screens, and they do.

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Bobos don't bite, but compensate by flying up your nose, in your ears, and behind your eyeglasses. They frequent mangroves and guano-covered rocky areas.

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We like bugs that eat the preceding pests: spiders.

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This spider has the most interesting body shape we've ever seen.

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And this spider's back end looks like a miniature hairbrush.

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We read somewhere that Dragonflies (who also eat bugs) have the highest success-ratio of any hunter: once they decide on dinner, it's almost certainly the catch-of-the-day.

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This dragonfly's wings appear a little moth-eaten, but it's actually how they are supposed to look.

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A nature trail took us past this large home - for termites, we were told.

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A close look at the termites is pretty sure to elicit an 'eeeeeewww!'

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Ladybugs are attractive.

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...as is this green beetle.

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And we also thought this moth very attractive. You can't ignore them when they flitter past - their low-pitched buzz is very loud.

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On the other hand, this moth is easy to miss when it's perched on bark or leaves.

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This bug (a tick?) is also well-camouflaged when not perched on our white fibreglass.

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Interesting 'winglets' on the rear legs.

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An underside view (of a dead bug).

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Really long antennae on a small head.

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A teeny one perched on the tip of a thumb.

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When the palm trees are blooming, a continuous bzzzzzzz emanates from the bouquets of blossoms.

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A wasp extracting nectar.

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Another view of the same wasp.

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This wasp walks on water and makes a cool shadow below.

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This colourful bug perched on our lifering for an entire afternoon.

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Closeup, one can see its colours come from tiny hairs/fur.